Apartment plants

Anthurium


Question: anturium


Good evening, I have several anturium plants, I wanted to know if I can decant two plants together into a larger pot. Thanks

Answer: anturium


Dear Gabriella,
anthuriums are evergreen plants, originating in southern America, which produce particular inflorescences, similar to those of the calle, with which they are closely related. The most cultivated species in Europe is anthurium andreanum, and its hybrids with inflorescences of particular color; the success of this species on the others is due to the fact that it produces inflorescences with great ease, and tends to adapt very well to the cultivation conditions present in the home and to life in the vase. In fact it produces beautiful fleshy roots, which often develop even outside the pot; the root system, however, tends to be not huge, and to prefer quite small containers, where the roots remain compact; for this reason, it is safely possible to place two different plants in a single vase, even simply to give rise to a plant with a fuller and richer appearance. So you can quietly do your repotting, provided you choose a small container, but not excessively, so that the roots of your two plants enter the vessel without problems and can have a little space to expand; try to position the two planes so that each one has a certain space around it, without placing them attached to each other. Anthuriums grow naturally in rainforests and have a particularly soft and porous soil at their disposal; an excellent mixture is prepared by mixing some universal soil, with bits of peat and sphagnum and maybe even some shredded bark, so that the substrate can collect a little humidity and keep it over time, without becoming too compact or heavy. Over the years the roots of the two plants will tend to get stuck together, and in a few years it will be almost impossible to disentangle them, keep this in mind when repotting, because if you want to divide the two plants in the future you will have to do it by cutting part of the roots. Immediately after repotting, wait at least a week before repotting, and only after about a month, do the usual fertilizer supplies. If you have room to keep your plants outdoors, in the garden or on the terrace, this is the best time to do it; keep in mind that at home the air is always excessively dry (due to heating or air conditioning) and therefore it is very beneficial to indoor plants to live for as long as possible outdoors, away from direct sunlight, but exposed to the elements .